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Asunto:[notisar] California USA: Nueve bomberos desaparecidos por accidente aéreo en EE.UU.
Fecha:Jueves, 7 de Agosto, 2008  13:28:05 (-0400)
Autor:Rescate Humboldt \(www.Rescate.com\) <rescatehumboldt @.....com>

ORGANIZACIÓN RESCATE HUMBOLDT / SAR / VENEZUELA
http://www.rescate.com e-mail : notisar-owner@yahoogroups.com

NOTISAR - NOTICIAS SOBRE RESCATES

Titulares: Nueve bomberos muertos en accidente aéreo

REDDING -- Nueve personas están presumiblemente muertas luego de que un helicóptero se estrelló en una remota zona boscosa del norte de California mientras transportaba a bomberos la noche del martes, dijo la Junta Nacional de Seguridad en el Transporte.

El helicóptero, un Sikorsky S-61N operado por el Servicio forestal federal, se estrelló cuando despegaba unas 35 millas al noroeste de Redding a eso de las 7:30 p.m. hora local, dijo el NTSB en una declaración.

Un incendio se desató después del accidente, dijo el NTSB en una declaración.

------

Nueve desaparecidos por accidente aéreo en EE.UU.

Washington, 6 ago (PL) Al menos nueve estadounidenses permanecen desaparecidos, luego de estrellarse en California un helicóptero del cuerpo de bomberos, reportó hoy la Administración Federal de Aviación (FAA).

Según la fuente, son casi nulas las posibilidades de encontrar sobrevivientes en el condado de Trinity, lugar del desastre.

Estas personas seguramente están muertas, lamentó el vocero de la FAA Ian Gregor.

Similar criterio expuso la supervisora del Servicio Forestal Sharon Heywood, quien recordó el tiempo transcurrido desde el desastre, acontecido en horas de la noche de este martes.

Varios bomberos fueron rescatados, aunque presentan severas quemaduras, dijeron directivos del hospital donde están internados, el Davis Medical Center.

lac/wmr

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Firefighters somber after deadly helicopter crash in Shasta-Trinity forest

Scene
Jakob Schiller / Redding Record Searchlight
According to GPS coordinates provided by the U.S. Forest Service, the scene of a helicopter crash is shown in this aerial photo taken Wednesday in Trinity County near Junction City, Calif. Eight firefighters and a pilot are missing and feared dead in the crash after a helicopter picked up workers battling a forest fire, officials said.
Crews are warned that emotions may hamper their ability to work safely. Witnesses of the crash believed to have killed 9 and injured 4 are to be debriefed and crash investigators are to arrive today.
By Maria LaGanga, Joe Mozingo and Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
9:17 AM PDT, August 7, 2008
JUNCTION CITY, Calif. -- The mood was somber today as firefighters battling fires in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest gathered for their regular briefing two days after the helicopter crash that is believed to have killed nine people and injured four.

"The recent helicopter accident may cause unusually strong emotional reactions and could interfere with your ability to work safely or function normally," Mike Donch, a human resources specialist with the firefighting effort, cautioned the group assembled at the early morning meeting.

Donch said that two "critical incident management teams" are arriving today to begin debriefing the crew members who witnessed the Tuesday night helicopter crash.

Grief counseling would also be available for any firefighters who need it, he said.

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board are also expected to arrive at the crash scene today.

The Sikorksy helicopter crashed about 7:45 p.m. Tuesday while taking off from a remote site about 35 miles northwest of Redding in Northern California, officials said.

The chopper was shuttling a hand crew back to its base in Junction City after three days of cutting fire lines in the wilderness. It took off with 11 firefighters and two pilots from a clearing cut by chain saws in the forest on a steep mountainside.

One of the survivors, Richard Schroeder, 42, said in a phone interview from his hospital room in Redding that it seemed that the helicopter's rotor hit a tree as it was taking off.

A father of five from Medford, Ore., Schroeder said someone behind him screamed for everyone to put their heads under their legs. "He was looking out the window and saw something," Schroeder said.

Schroeder's stomach dropped as the helicopter pitched forward and plummeted. He blacked out on impact and came to with a body on him, he said. He shoved the body off and saw that the tail of the aircraft was on fire.

His mouth was bleeding heavily and he could barely breathe. He said he thought, "I'm not dying here," and unbuckled himself and kicked out a partially broken window. He wiggled his way outside. Men above screamed at him to scramble up the slope.

The helicopter exploded as he watched from above. "I was totally shocked," he said. "I lost all my friends."

Schroeder sustained serious injuries to his neck, shoulder and back. He did not suffer any burns, he said.

Another crew on the ground waiting to be shuttled out alerted the base camp about the crash, and rescue crews were immediately dispatched to the scene, authorities said.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were sending investigators to the scene to determine why the helicopter failed to lift off.

Ten of the victims, including Schroeder, are affiliated with Merlin, Ore.-based Grayback Forestry, one of the largest and longest-established private firefighting contractors. The company identified two other survivors also from Medford: Michael Brown, 20, and Jonathan Frohreich, 18. Grayback was still notifying the relatives of the missing individuals Wednesday night and had not released their names.

Brown, Frohreich and another victim were taken to UC Davis Regional Burn Center in Sacramento, where two of them were listed in critical condition and the third was listed in serious condition in the intensive care unit, according to Carole Gan, a hospital spokeswoman.

"All of them have burns," Gan said, declining to provide additional information on their injuries or identities.

Dennis Hulbert, the U.S. Forest Service aviation director for California, notified the widow of a Forest Service employee who died in the crash.

"It's too early to know anything," he said, referring to the cause of the crash. "There are a lot of variables. There was a post-crash fire. It's still burning. It was horrific."